Bachelors / Masters Projects – University of Copenhagen

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X-Ray and Neutron Science > Bachelors / Masters Pr...

Bachelors / Masters Projects

Investigation of interpenetrating polymer networks for drug delivery under mechanical deformation by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)
The company Biomodics have developed a patented technique to incorporate a hydrogel into silicone rubber, which is widely used for tubing in biomedicine, for example in urinary catheters used in hospitals. The advantage of Biomodics’s material is that the incorporation of hydrogel prevents the formation of biofilms (germs) and that the material potentially can be used for drug delivery. The LINX (Linking Industry to Neutrons and X-rays) group at NBI is involved in a project with the company in which their materials are studied with small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS). For more information see here >>
 
 

Block copolymer self-assembly under hyperbolic confinement

Numerical simulations reveal a family of hierarchical and chiral multicontinuous network structures self-assembled from a melt blend of Y-shaped ABC and ABD three-miktoarm star terpolymers, se figure below. These mesostructures are among the most topologically complex morphologies identified to date and represent an example of hierarchical ordering within a hyperbolic pattern, a unique mode of soft matter self-assembly. In this project the idea is to implement a simulation setup to investigate the self-assembly of model block copolymers under different hyperbolic constraints, i.e. where the polymer are forced to assemble within a thin curved film. For more information see here >>

If you are interested - please contact Jacob Kirkensgaard (jjkk@nbi.ku.dk)

Simulation and experimental study of block copolymers self-assembling under spherical confinement

A relatively new, but conceptually simple experimental procedure makes it possible to form spherically confined nano-particles out of block copolymers by a clever evaporation of mixed good and bad solvent for the polymers. A new simulation setup allows to simulate such spherically confined systems of arbitrary mixtures of block copolymers which reproduce existing experimental results for diblock copolymers. In this project the idea is to investigate the effect of confinement on  new metal containing diblocks and/or ABC star polymeric systems which in the melt state form many complex structures already. For more information see here >>

If you are interested - please contact Jacob Kirkensgaard (jjkk@nbi.ku.dk)     

Block copolymer self-assembly under double spherical (shell) nano-confinement       

A relatively new, but conceptually simple experimental procedure makes it possible to form spherically confined nano-particles out of block copolymers by a clever evaporation of mixed good and bad solvent for the polymers. A new simulation setup allows to simulate such spherically confined systems of arbitrary mixtures of block copolymers which reproduce existing experimental results for diblock copolymers. In this project the idea is to investigate the effect of such confinement when the polymers at the same time are restricted to move on an inner sphere which could either be a metal nanoparticle or a liquid core. If this is a Master project there is a possibility to expand the project experimentally. For more information see here >>

If you are interested - please contact Jacob Kirkensgaard (jjkk@nbi.ku.dk

Structural characterization of thylakoid membrane stacks

Thylakoid membranes (TM) are a vital part of the photosynthetic machinery in green plants, cyanobacteria and algae as most of the proteins taking part of the light capturing is embedded in this membrane system. TM’s has a very striking organization on mesoscales as they arrange into stacked cylindrical domains, ‘grana’, surrounded by membrane sheets,‘stroma lamellae’, connecting other grana. Ultimately we are interested in the role of this organization in the process of photosynthesis and specifically the structural behavior in the grana stack.

The project will be focused on structural characterization of well-defined TM’s cross-characterized by electron microscopy. This will be done performing detailed measurements using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). There are many possible directions for a project within this field - please come and discuss if interested. For more information see here >>

If you are interested - please contact Jacob Kirkensgaard (jjkk@nbi.ku.dk